Coronavirus: How eyes may play a role in its spread

Our eyes might play an important role in the spread and prevention of the coronavirus outbreak seen throughout the world.

To cut your personal risk of contracting the coronavirus, avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands. The mucous membranes that line various cavities in the body are most susceptible to transmission of the virus.

Patients who have contracted the coronavirus may have ocular symptoms including Conjunctivitis – an inflammation of the membrane covering the eyeball. This is often referred to as “pink eye” and often presents as an infected/red, “wet and weepy” eye. Conjunctivitis is very contagious, and a patient can cause the spread from one eye to the other. Learn more

Brian Lamb, Our 2020 Person of Vision

Brian Lamb

Brian Lamb

Preserve Vision Florida is proud to announce that on February 3, 2020 the Board of Governors will honor Brian Lamb as its 2020 Person of Vision.

The Person of Vision Award has been presented annually since 1979 to honor an individual who has had a profound impact on the Tampa Bay region or the State of Florida through true community leadership and vision.

Brian Lamb serves as executive vice president of Fifth Third Bank, heading Retail Banking and Retail Brokerage. He has held a variety of leadership roles since joining Fifth Third, including head of Wealth & Asset Management and chief corporate responsibility and reputation officer. He oversaw the bank’s civic commitments and reputation management, including the execution of the bank’s five-year, $32 billion Community Commitment. He also was the regional president of Fifth Third Bank (North Florida) and chief financial officer of the Tampa Bay market.

A graduate of the University of South Florida, Brian is the immediate past chair of the USF’s Board of Trustees and is a member of the Board of Governors of the State University System for Florida.  He earned his bachelor’s degree in accounting and an MBA from the University of South Florida. He is also a graduate of Stonier Banking School at the University of Pennsylvania. While a student, he was a very successful member of the USF men’s basketball team from 1994 to 1998.

Previously, he was a member of the Florida Council of 100 Board of Directors and the United Way Suncoast Campaign Cabinet. Brian was named to Savoy Magazine’s 2018 list of Top 100 Most Influential Blacks in Corporate America, and in 2016 he was named to the Tampa Bay Business Hall of Fame.  He also served as chairman of the audit committee for the Enterprise Florida Board of Directors and chairman of the Tampa Bay Partnership. He also serves as a board member of the Urban League of Southwestern Ohio. 

The Evening’s Toasters:

Judy Genshart
President Emerita
University of South Florida
2002 Person of Vision

Oscar Horton
Sun State International Trucks LLC

Ernest Lamb

H. Lee Moffitt
Founder of Moffitt Cancer Center
2019 Person of Vision

Will Weatherford
Weatherford Capital

Join us for the 2020 Person of Vision Award Dinner
Monday, February 3, 2020
Renaissance Tampa International Plaza Hotel
4200 Jim Walter Boulevard, Tampa, FL
5:15 p.m.  Private Reception
6 p.m.  Cocktail Reception
7 p.m.  Dinner and Award Program

Business Attire

View or download the sponsorship and registration form.

Discover previous honorees.

 

May is Ultraviolet Awareness Month

Exposure to UV rays can burn delicate eye tissue and raise the risk of developing cataracts and eye cancer. Sunglasses help.

woman wearing hat and sunglasses

Proper sunglasses and a wide-brimmed hat reduce exposure to UV rays.

Ultraviolet Awareness

The sun releases energy (radiation) in many forms. The sunlight we see is one form. The heat we feel from the sun is another. Ultraviolet (UV) rays, a third type, are also invisible to the eye. UV rays cause sunburn. They can also damage your eyes and hurt your vision.

There are two types of UV rays: UV-A and UV-B. Over time, the effects of UV rays may help cause a number of eye problems.

UV-A can hurt your central vision. It can damage the macula, a part of the retina at the back of your eye.

UV-BThe front part of your eye (the cornea and the lens) absorbs most UV-B rays, but these rays may cause even more damage to your eyes than UV-A rays.

What Eye Problems Can UV Rays Cause?

Macular Degeneration

UV rays may lead to macular degeneration, a leading cause of vision loss for older Americans.

Cataract

UV rays, especially UV-B rays, may also cause some kinds of cataracts. A cataract is a clouding of the eye’s natural lens, the part of the eye that focuses the light we see.

Pterygium

Another UV-related problem is a growth called pterygium. This growth begins on the white of the eye and may involve the cornea. Eventually, the growth may block vision. It is more common in people who work outside in the sun and wind.

Skin Cancer

Skin cancer around the eyelids is also linked to prolonged UV exposure.

Corneal Sunburn

Corneal sunburn, called photokeratitis, is the result of high short-term exposure to UV-B rays. Long hours at the beach or skiing without proper eye protection can cause this problem. It can be very painful and may cause temporary vision loss.

You can protect your eyes from UV rays in two important ways:

  1. Know the dangers of UV rays.
  2. Wear proper eye protection and hats that block UV rays.

UV rays can come from many directions. They radiate directly from the sun, but they are also reflected from the ground, from water, snow, sand and other bright surfaces.

Wear Sunglasses and a Brimmed Hat

Use eyewear that absorbs UV rays and wear a brimmed hat or cap.

A wide-brimmed hat or cap will block about half of UV rays. A brimmed hat or cap can also limit UV rays that hit the eyes from above or around glasses.

Eyewear that absorbs UV rays gives you the most protection. All types of eyewear, including prescription and non-prescription glasses, contact lenses and lens implants, should absorb UV-A and UV-B rays. For UV protection in everyday eyewear, there are several options like UV-blocking lens materials, coatings and photochromic lenses. UV protection does not cost a lot of money and does not get in the way of seeing clearly.